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Therapy in Boston and Cambridge Understand the root causes of the challenges you are facing, and develop skills and techniques to overcome them.

Resolve relationship difficulties.
Access your full potential.
Learn to manage your mood.

High-pressure careers can put a strain on your mental health and your relationships. Families, partners and children of individuals in these careers also face unique challenges. We're here to help.

At Azimuth you’ll work with some of the best psychologists in Boston and Cambridge, trained in a wide range of therapy approaches. They will help you gain perspective, approach problems more productively, and develop skills you will carry with you for the rest of your life.

To get started, we’ll match you with one of our psychologists who specializes in the areas in which you’d like to focus. Over the next several weeks you’ll learn more about yourself, your situation, and skills you can use in your day to day life to achieve your goals.

Therapy techniques we use at Azimuth

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): This is a popular type of therapy that highlights how our thoughts impact our emotions and actions, even when we don’t realize it. A main focus of CBT is building skills to consciously identify and rearrange thinking patterns that are unhelpful or inaccurate.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT): DBT is popular for clinicians helping individuals suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), focusing on topics such as mindfulness and interpersonal skills. “True” DBT is done in a group format, with weekly meetings with a skills coach who is on call 24/7. However, many clinicians incorporate some aspects of DBT into their work on a less formal basis.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): ACT includes some CBT principles, but also incorporates aspects of acceptance and mindfulness. Eliminating negative feelings is not the goal; instead to goal is to identify and accept them. The goal is to help you move forward with an ability to observe yourself and to choose to act differently in the moment.

Psychoanalysis and Psychodynamic Therapy: Psychoanalytic theory was developed by Sigmund Freud. In this theory, there are three parts of the brain (the Id, the Ego, and the Superego) that combine to cause you to behave in certain ways. There is also the concept of “defense mechanisms” that are used unconsciously to keep negative thoughts at bay. In psychoanalysis, clients often lay on the couch and free-associate. The focus is on the internal world of the client. Psychodynamic theory is derived from Freud’s original psychoanalytic theory, with a specific focus on the therapist-client relationship.

Mindfulness-Based Therapy: Mindfulness means keeping focus in the present, instead of focusing on the past or future. Mindfulness exercises are meant to train the brain to simply notice thoughts that come into your mind, let them go, and focus on the here and now. Mindfulness has been incorporated into many different therapy approaches.

Motivational Interviewing (MI): Motivational Interviewing is a technique used to help better understand feelings of ambivalence and to increase motivation for change. This is done by helping the individual understand their goals and values, and how their current actions interfere with these desires.